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Read, Listen, Watch

We recommend finding out as much as you can about adoption before, during and after the adoption process. The following is a list of media and books that many of our adoptive parents and social workers have found useful. If you notice that we’ve missed a great book you’ve read or podcast you’ve listened to about adoption or would like to review a book then please let us know by emailing us at: contact@adopt4vvc.org.

CoramBAAF also have a comprehensive list of books and resources for adopters and children. Find out more by visiting their website.

Read: Guides and Books for Adults 

  •  No Matter What – Sally Donovan
     ‘No Matter What’ is a first-hand account of the adoption process written by an adoptive mother. Sally tells the story of her and her husband Rob and their journey from a diagnosis of infertility to their decision to adopt to post adoption. She talks honestly about the couple’s difficulties living with infertility, making the decision to adopt and the process of adoption. An easy going, heartfelt read that gives an insight into the process of adoption and attachment issues. 
  •  What to expect when you’re adopting – Dr Ian Palmer 
     What to expect when you are adopting is a non-fiction guide that explains the realities of adopting and what to expect at each stage. The book covers a range of topics and is good for reference at different points in the adoption process. 
  •  A Guide for Gay Dads – Stonewall 
     A Guide for Gay Dads is a great resource, written by Stonewall for male couples and gay single men who are looking into the routes to becoming a dad. The guide covers the range of options available including adoption. It also contains stories from dads about a range of topics and there is advice and guidance covering specific concerns and questions gay males may have. You can read the guide for free:  https://www.stonewall.org.uk/sites/default/files/A_Guide_for_Gay_Dads__1_.pdf
  • Related by Adoption – Heidi Argent
    Related by adoption is a handbook for family members who become related to children through adoption e.g. grandparents, aunts, uncles etc. Adoption effects the whole family and different members might have different questions specific to the role that they will play in the child / children’s life. This handbook is a good guide for relatives and can be used to inform and create discussion around modern adoption within your family.   
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Watch and Listen: Podcasts, Films, Series and Youtube for Adults 

  •  The Adoption – BBC Radio 4

    The Adoption is a series of seventeen podcasts from the BBC. It follows the real life story of Bethany and Ben’s adoption over nineteen months. The series highlights the UK adoption process through the eyes of those affected including the children, birth parents, extended family, social workers, foster parents and adoptive parents. Each episode is between ten and fifteen minutes long. You can find the whole series on BBC Radio 4 or on the Podcast App on iOS. 

  • Vale, Valleys and Cardiff - Youtube

    Our Youtube channel is the place where we share the stories of our adopters, our news and any other visual resources that we create: Vale, Valleys and Cardiff Youtube

  •  Coram - Youtube 

    Coram / Coran Baff are a charity who work with adoptive parents and adopted children as well as professionals. Their Youtube channel highlights some of the work that they do including working with adopted children and young adults and people who are looking to adopt: Coram Youtube 

  • Adoption UK - Youtube 

    Adoption UK are a charity who work with adoptive parents and adopted children. Their Youtube channel includes some interesting interviews from BBC’s The One Show: Adoption UK Youtube

  • Find me a family – Available onYoutube (originally produced by the BBC)

    A two part series looking at the lives of 11 children in Northern Ireland. The care system in Northern Ireland is slightly different Wales however the documentary explains some of the early life experiences and some of the reasons why children are planned for adoption. The documentary also covers a range of different adoption topics including contact with birth family and adoptive families with children already living with them.

    You can watch the series here:

    Find me a Family - Part 1  

    Find me a Family – Part 2

  • ReMoved 

    ReMoved is a short film following the emotional journey of a nine-year old girl, Zoe who has to leave her birth home and is placed in foster care system (USA). In the sequel ‘Remember My Story’ Zoe deals with the court system, foster home life, her birth mom's attempts at getting her life together, the loss of her brother and her future. Although American fostering and adoption is often very different to the UK system these films highlight some of the emotional upheaval faced by children who have entered the care system. The films explore how these experiences can impact children’s behaviour and understanding of the world around them and why therapeutic parenting and support are so important: ReMoved Series 

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Blogs and Vlogs

  •  The Unlikely Dad
    Tom is adoptive dad to Kai. With beautiful photography, lots of posts about adoption, day to day life being a dad and some collab posts: The Unlikely Dad. He is also on Instagram @unlikelydad

  • Suddernly Mummy

    Suddenly Mummy is a single mother who talks about her experiences fostering and adopting. She posts about her experiences as a single adopter and talks about subjects such as behaviour, education and trauma: Suddenly Mummy

  • Stevie Blaine

    Stevie (and occasionally his partner Sam) talk in their vlogs about the UK adoption process. The couple vlog through the process of adoption which they are undertaking with their local council. Although the adoption process varies slightly across the UK Stevie’s vlogs give a great insight into the process and are relatable: Stevie Blaine

  • Daddy and Dad

    Daddy and dad is a blog by Jamie and Tom who are daddy and dad to Lyall and Richard. Jamie and Tom blogged the process of adoption and now talk about their day to day life as dads. There is also a section of the website dedicated to stories from other LGBT parents: Daddy and Dad 

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 Useful Websites for Adults 

  • National Adoption Service for Wales (NAS Cymru)

    Promotes and supports best practice in adoption across Wales: www.adoptcymru.com

  • British Association of Adoption and Fostering

    National organisation providing information and training: www.corambaaf.org.uk

  • Adoption UK 
    National organisation set up by adoptive parents: www.adoptionuk.org
  • After Adoption 
    Support for adopted people and families: www.afteradoption.org.uk
  • New Family Social 
    Support for LGBT adoptive and fostering families: www.newfamilysocial.co.uk
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Read: Books for Children 

  •  The Teazlers’ Baby Bunny – Susan Bagnall
     ‘The Teazlers’ Baby Bunny’ tells the story of the preparation and the time leading up to the arrival of a baby bunny to the Teazler’ family. The aim of the book is to familiarise children with the idea of adoption. The book comes with a handy guide for parents which explains how to use the book to create discussion around adoption. The book is aimed at children aged two years+. 
  • The Most Precious Present in the World – Becky Edwards 
     In ‘The Most Precious Present in the World’ Mia, an adopted child, is feeling confused and sad because she doesn’t look like her mum and dad. Throughout the book Mia’s mum explains to her that her birth mum and dad gave her gifts that make her look like them but that her birth parents gave her mum and dad the most precious gift in the world, which is her. This book is great to read with children to start discussions around identity. It can also help children feel reassured that they can speak about their life story and that they are loved and safe in their new family.  
  • A Safe Place for Rufus – Jill Seeney
    Rufus the cat moves in with a new family and has to learn how to overcome his fears and learn his new home is safe and permanent and the new family love him. This book helps children feel reassured that it’s okay to find change hard and it helps them to discover that just like Rufus they can find ways to get rid of their fears and feel safe. The book comes with a handy guide for parents which explains how to use the book to create discussion around adoption and feeling safe. The book is aimed at children aged three years+.
  • Nutmeg Gets Adopted – Judith Foxon
    Nutmeg Gets Adopted is the story of Nutmeg, a young squirrel and his family. Nutmeg’s birth family are unable to look after him and his siblings so Beth Badger has to find them a new family; first a foster family and then a forever family. The book is a great resource to start to talk to children about their life-story. The book gives the child an opportunity to ask why they had to leave home and any questions they have about why this happened and help them talk about their feelings about being adopted. The book comes with a guide which explains how to use the book to create discussion. This book is ideal for children who are waiting for an adoptive family, or who have recently been placed. The book is part of series of books that help adopted children to understand different topics that may affect them. 
  • Chester and Daisy Move On
    Chester and Daisy live with their birth bear family but when things start to go wrong they have to move to a new family. The story explains to children that sometimes birth parents can’t look after their little bears and that’s why they are placed with a new family. The book is helpful to explain to children the path they are taking / took to living with their new family. The book explains thoughts and feelings and looks at letterbox contact.     
  • And Tango Makes Three – Justin Richardson and Peter Parnell 
     ‘And Tango Makes Three’ explores same sex parents and adoption. Roy and Silo, two male penguins see all the other heterosexual penguins having babies and want to start a family of their own. The keeper brings them an egg so that they can have their own baby. 
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Watch: Films and Series for Children 

  • Goodnight Mr Tom 

    Based on the 1981 award winning book by Michelle Magorian and set during the Second World War, ‘Goodnight Mr Tom’ is the story of Willie Beech and Tom Oakley’s adjustment to living together. Willie is evacuated from London during the Blitz. The story highlights the adjustment for adults and children to leaving together and the bonds that can be formed. During the film Willie remembers his time with his mother and the film explores his childhood experiences including separation and neglect along with Tom’s experience of having a new child in his life.

    The film can be used to open up discussion around adoption, birth families, trauma, neglect, separation, identity, early life experiences and for conversation about family life together.  

  • Inside Out - Pixar

    When Riley is uprooted from her Midwest life and moves to San Francisco because of her dads new job Riley’s emotions; Joy, Fear, Anger, Disgust and Sadness are thrown into confusion. Riley’s emotions live in ‘Headquarters’ (inside Riley's mind). Although Joy, Riley's primary emotion, tries to keep things positive, the other emotions conflict on how best to navigate her new environment. The film also explores that the adults around her also have emotions that drive their behaviours and actions. This is a great film for creating discussion around emotions and change. 

  • Mathilda

    Mathilda is the story of a girl who suffers emotional and physical neglect and verbal abuse from her birth family. Mathilda meets characters through the story who shape her understanding of the world around her. The story also talks about Miss Honey, Mathilda’s teacher’s relationship with her aunt after the loss of her father. This film can open up discussions around some of the reasons children are placed for adoption, their negative early life experiences and how your past doesn’t have to define your future.

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